Got some good news from my friends at Challenger, Gray & Christmas this week. Apparently, despite the need to cut costs during these challenging economic times, a majority of companies are working diligently to preserve employee perks, and many are still planning to hand out year-end bonus checks. (I’m keeping my fingers crossed that Colorado Publishing Co. and Dolan Media are not among the companies in the minority.)
The balancing process for the City's 2005 General Fund Budget is complete. This year's proceedings were made easier by improved sales tax revenues and tough decisions made in 2004 to curb spending. The City's fiscal condition has improved due to growth in the national economy, modest improvements...
<em>The camera don’t lie You’re coming back down and you really don’t mind You had a bad day You had a bad day — Daniel Powter</em> We’ll make that two bad days. In a row. Back to back. It started last Friday. With an e-mail. That got to my inbox at 5:57 a.m. So it was waiting for me when I logged on to my work computer at the crack of 7. The subject line: Mr SOMEONE YOU CALL YOUR FRIEND, WANTS YOU DEAD.
While the economy is dominating the headlines, concerns about health care aren’t far behind. For businesses and individuals, the two are inextricably linked: the U.S. employer-based health insurance market still provides coverage to nearly two-thirds of the population under 65.
Do geezers rule national politics? Let’s see — on Nov. 3, 2020, Donald Trump will be 74, Bernie Sanders 79, Joe Biden 78, Chuck Schumer 70 and Nancy Pelosi 80. Then there are the young upstarts; Kamala Harris 56, Beto O’Rourke 48, and Cory Booker 51. And last are...
After a few weeks off the helpful hints for surviving a turbulent economy wagon, I thought it was probably time to jump back on and pass along some additional pointers. The following advice comes from Edward A. Testa, vice president of sales at Greystone equipment lending and leasing in Burlington, Mass. What grabbed my attention was how he described the current environment.
The next time someone asks me why I spend so much time at the office I’m going to have a really good answer: It’s safer there. According to the National Safety Council, workplace death rates have fallen 17 percent since 1992, while fatalities occurring off the job are up 14 percent. (Considering some of the neighborhoods I’ve lived in during my not-so-illustrious journalism career, I really should have known this without having to read a fax.)
Proponents of a city-owned downtown convention center, unable to sell their cockamamie scheme on its merits, are now trying to persuade citizens they shouldn't have the right to vote on such a project. Tom James writes in the March 16 CSBJ that Issue 200 will hamstring Colorado...
Colorado Springs voters will have another opportunity to elect representatives to Colorado Springs City Council April 2. With the job of mayor and three at-large council seats up for grabs, this is an opportunity for voters to choose candidates who are prepared to make decisions about the role of...
Twenty years ago I moved from a big house near downtown to a smaller spread on the Westside. It was still a good-sized place, an 1899 Victorian on a big lot. I loved its turn-of-the-century charm, never suspecting that underneath that elegant exterior was an extortionist constantly in need...
In 2021, Colorado Springs will turn 150. Seems like a long time, but that may depend upon your perspective. My grandmother, who lived most of her long life in Colorado Springs, was born in Boston in 1871. I was born here in 1940 and am now more than half...
When former Gov. John Hickenlooper attended the U.S. Olympic Museum and Hall of Fame’s groundbreaking in June 2017, he was quoted as saying “Topophilia is the love of place. All of Colorado has it, but it is particularly evident in Colorado Springs.” Those who live here often extol the amenities...