I have no defense. They’re right — I did indeed publicly (and privately, in the voting booth) support those devil-spawned Democrat candidates. I’ll take my punishment like a man — no more Republican caucuses for me!
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We think we know everything that’s going on around us. We think we fully understand the details, the priorities and the needs of our military and its related high-tech presence. Whether we are business leaders, elected officials or media observers, we try to keep up, try to pay close attention, and most of us feel […]
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Last week, I was a writer in residence. I’d volunteered for the gig, but that morning, I moaned on Facebook. What was I thinking? I’d be talking to a bunch of snarky middle-schoolers about my writing process? Reading my little pieces about pets and kids and the Czech Republic to kids...
Dear Editor: Thank you to the CSBJ for encouraging a solution to our traffic congestion problems. You understand the major economic impact congestion can have on our local economy if we do nothing to improve the situation. And congratulations to City Council and the County Commissioners for taking a...
We are facing a critical time as a community. We are losing 25-44-year-olds who make us an attractive area for high-tech companies. We lag behind other cities in attracting venture capital. As David White, vice president of marketing at the Economic Development Corp. said: “In this changing world, it is incumbent on all communities to re-evaluate their priorities on economic development.”
Can anyone honestly believe that such asceticism will protect us from attack — given that Saudi Arabia and Iran actively sponsored terrorism when oil was $10 a barrel?
Yesterday a conversation with the executive director of a nonprofit organization reminded me of many similar conversations over the years. “Nonprofit leadership is really, really hard. Why is that?” she pleaded. “I’m not sure if my board or staff really understand how much I struggle trying to run this organization. Was it meant to be […]
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We seem to be in the midst of one of our periodic funks — when we worry about our so-called leadership class. “Alas and alack!” we complain. “We have no leadership!! Where are the great, visionary leaders who will lift us from the slough of despond to the shining heights...
Just like yesterday, I still remember my first drive into the Black Forest. It was in the fall of 1977, on a beautiful weekday afternoon. I was feeling a little homesick, though I never would’ve admitted it at 25, having moved here from my native state of Arkansas a few...
The “Quality of Life Indicators Project,” which Pikes Peak United Way unveiled yesterday afternoon, is a worthy and interesting project. Calling on the skills of more than 100 community leaders, as well as the efforts of dozens of volunteers, United Way has produced a 100-page statistical snapshot of our community. Howard Brooks, who spearheaded the effort for United Way, said that the goal of the report is “to help community members prioritize and make educated decisions about which areas deserve investment of time, talent and resources.”
Every January, without fail, some intrepid reporters covering the state Legislature in Denver do a little digging and come up with a few interesting stories, based on a sampling of proposed bills that are beginning to work their way through the General Assembly. Sometimes those first stories come out before...
Detroit: fading and moribund, plagued by crime, with a decaying central city, a public school system in crisis, a disgraced mayor, plummeting property values and chronically high unemployment. Colorado Springs: vibrant and growing, located in a setting of unparalleled beauty, with good schools, abundant employment opportunities, low taxes, honest government and business-friendly policies.
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