One of the fastest growing types of phone service is called Voice over Internet Protocol or VoIP. In fact, The Forrester Research Group predicts that nearly five million U.S. households will have VoIP phone service by the end of 2006. The biggest draws for the home and business users of VoIP are price and flexibility. VoIP is certainly less expensive than most traditional phone services, and offers many options not available through those services. For example, users have the ability to check voicemail or place calls from a PC outside of one’s home or business.
The delivery will be videotaped and “choice segments” will be available online – because there is no doubt that people will log on to watch, because we’ve become a voyeuristic society.
As a federal government employee who compiles earnings histories about individuals convicted of crimes, I’m appalled at the number of illegal immigrants using forged identities, and the disproportionate number of legal immigrants engaged in crime. And yet, like many Americans, I’m of two minds on the immigration controversy. I’m equally disappointed when people guilty of wrongful, but non-violent behavior – crossing our borders in search of freedom without a visa, for example – are allowed no avenue to overcome that stigma.
What kind of title is this? Actually, it was the title of a section of Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway’s just released annual report. I figure, if it’s good enough for the world’s greatest investor, it’s good enough for me. In this report, Buffet tells a fable about a wealthy American family prospering as the family business grows.
Congress will soon begin debating about the value of expanding trade with our friends in the Dominican Republic and Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador. From the perspective of a former small business owner, the prospect of expanding trade opportunities through the Dominican Republic-Central American Free...
I spent Monday morning at the office. I know it was technically a holiday, but I wanted to try to clean off my desk and start the New Year without being buried under the stack of papers that I had accumulated in 2005. And I wasn’t the only person working in our building. Tom Hoff, who has the office across the hall, was also wrapping up a couple of loose ends. Tom does polygraphs and investigations – it means he’s always got an interesting story or two to tell.
A couple of interesting news releases came across my desk recently.Neither was earth-shattering-breaking news, but both seemed to be just interesting enough to throw into the "possible column ideas" basket.The first (of course there really is no particular order of importance here) concerns a survey that Accountemps commissioned to...
What a long strange trip it’s been. Thirty years ago, Colorado Springs was a different city. It was smaller, for one thing. For another, it was reeling from a dual economic punch: the national savings and loan scandal and the local collapse of Frank Aries’ plans for Banning-Lewis Ranch. The year...
"Colorado is in trouble," says Gov. Bill Owens, and he is correct. The 2001 recession hit our state hard. Revenue to our state's operating account, the general fund, fell by more than $1 billion. We made huge cuts in our budget as a result.For example, we cut state funding...
“One line is too much,” a Florida friend told me 40 years ago, “and one kilo is not enough.” He was warning me about the dangers of cocaine (which I more or less avoided), but he didn’t touch on other expensive, life-altering, career-endangering, mind-destroying addictive behaviors. Consider running for elected office,...
It’s nice to see that the Downtown Partnership and the Greater Downtown Business Improvement District are going to subsidize the Colorado Springs Police Department and rid downtown of its homeless population. According to an e-mail sent to “Downtowners” from the Downtown Partnership, the groups have decided to get tough with the “escalating presence of the street population in downtown” by hiring “off-duty police officers to patrol the downtown area.”
We were glad to learn that City Council chose Penny Culbreth-Graft as our new city manager, replacing the recently retired Lorne Kramer. We particularly congratulate council on breaking the “glass ceiling” by appointing a woman to the city’s highest post.