Walking from the Business Journal's office on Platte Avenue to meet my geezer homies for coffee last week, I thought about Jane Jacobs. The author of "The Death and Life of Great American Cities," Jacobs was the first urbanist, as we've come to understand the term. Written during 1961, the...
Does Colorado Springs have a permanent governing class? The April city election tossed that commonly held belief into the dustbin of history, but the election-night wag who said that “Boulder just moved to Colorado Springs” was wrong. This is a city dominated by the Republican Party. President Trump swept El...
Last week, we featured a feel-good look at the nine best things ever to happen to our sometimes benighted community. This week: a sourly opinionated account of the seven worst events in our city’s checkered history. Is the field of Armageddon located right here in Colorado Springs? Have we, like...
Remember multiple-choice questions? Here’s one. Our city’s fiscal difficulties are a result of: 1. Feckless, improvident decisions by city council, such as mortgaging the Police Operations Center to pay off their jock pals at the USOC! 2. Feckless, improvident decisions by local voters, who have been consistently led down the primrose path...
Following Val Snider’s decision not to seek a second at-large term on City Council, it’s clear at least three new members will take their seats at the Council dais after the April 7 city elections. Jan Martin is term-limited after eight years and can’t run again. Merv Bennett will run for a second term, and […]
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Late Tuesday afternoon, a cryptic text from Perry Sanders popped up on my screen. “Hilton removed from the house Palmer built.” It was soon clear that Sanders and his partner, attorney John Goede of Florida, had closed their deal. The Hilton logo disappeared from the shabby downtown icon, and a bright...
These folks have ruled their markets for decades — for more than a century, by some accounts. The product they sell is in many ways indistinguishable from similar products marketed by hundreds, even thousands, of competitors. But, by restricting access to their products and by sophisticated pricing strategies, they’ve created an enormous demand reservoir.
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It was a spirited and amiable crowd that assembled on April 16 to hear John Suthers, Bill Murray, Tom Strand and Wayne Williams take the oath of office on the south steps of the Pioneers Museum. About 500 people were there to enjoy the show, which included prayers, music,...
C’mon, fess up, did you pay your bill from the Stormwater Enterprise? It’s OK, neither did I. Oh, I got the bill in the mail some time ago, and I put it aside to pay, and then I just didn’t. I guess I had a Doug Bruce moment. As you may know, ol’ Mr. Antitax, the Dougster himself, claims that the so-called stormwater fee isn’t a fee, but a tax; and as such, should have been authorized by a vote of the people.
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This year might well be remembered as a watershed moment in Colorado Springs politics — a time when voters and elected officials alike abandoned the deadlock and dysfunction that plagued the city ever since the 2011 voter-mandated switch to a strong-mayor form of government. In retrospect, the thaw began on...
Since the first Europeans ventured into the Pikes Peak region during the 19th century, eager entrepreneurs have sought to exploit the mountain. We’ve built a trail, a railroad and a highway to the summit, and we handed over the majestic summit plain to a souvenir shop, a doughnut bar, a...
There’s a wonderful, if likely apocryphal, anecdote describing Winston Churchill’s reaction to the post-World War II takeover of Yugoslavia by Marshall Tito’s communist “partizans.” As the story goes, a young intelligence officer burst into Churchill’s office to inform him, in agitated tones, that Yugoslavia was about to fall into communist hands.
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