Nov. 7 is Election Day — at least theoretically. In fact the election has been in progress for weeks, as residents fill out, mail in or deliver their ballots. This now quaint and inconvenient process (who mails anything these days?) was eagerly embraced a couple of decades ago by...
Douglas Bruce is our own Don Quixote, brandishing a rusty sword, and still spoiling for a fight. Good for him — but bad for our city. 
When Environmental Protection Agency boss Scott Pruitt traveled to West Virginia to announce the official end of the “War on Coal” a couple of weeks ago, it was a nice piece of political gamesmanship, but otherwise content-free. Coal producers didn’t announce thousands of new hires; electric utilities didn’t reopen shuttered...
Guided by a well-executed political strategy, Transit Mix has filed a new application with the State Mined Land Reclamation Board to open a rock aggregate quarry on the historic Hitch Rack Ranch, located south of Colorado Springs on Highway 115. Last year the MLRB unexpectedly denied the company’s original application...
Sorting through boxes of junk in the basement, I came across a copy of the May 4, 2000, issue of the Colorado Springs Independent. Here’s a strangely topical excerpt from my 17-year-old column. “If you want to know how government works, in its innocent, conniving way, go take a look...
As we meander through life we carry a figurative bucket filled to the brim with coulda/shouldas, decision points where we screwed up. As a certain milestone birthday approaches, I pawed through the bucket and unearthed dozens of epic, awesomely blockheaded and consequential screwups. Surely, I reflected, no one person could...
According to a memorandum leaked to the Washington Post earlier this week, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke has proposed substantial changes in boundaries and management policies for 10 national monuments. Changes would affect monuments created by presidents Bill Clinton, Barack Obama and George W. Bush. The proposed changes would...
According to a recent analysis by The New York Times, Denver is the logical location for Amazon’s new headquarters. The Mile High City checks all the boxes — a metro area of more than 1 million with a diverse population, an international airport, superb public transportation, a vibrant tech...
According to urban theorist Richard Florida, once-aspirational cities such as Seattle, Portland and Denver are yesterday’s news, struggling with their own success. In a recent New York Times op-ed entitled “The Urban Revival Is Over,” Florida argues that big cities have become bizarrely expensive, that infrastructure is decaying, crime is...
What do our proudly conservative city/county/Colorado Springs School District 11 elected officials want? Mo’ money! On the November ballot, Mayor John Suthers, with the support of a 6-3 supermajority of city council, will ask Colorado Springs voters to approve fee-based funding for a revamped stormwater enterprise. The annual tab? About $17...
If you’re a charitable nonprofit, a state entity, local government or a noncommercial cause-oriented organization, you won’t last long without filling a certain crucial position: grant writer. The city of Colorado Springs is no exception to this rule. Multiple city employees are directly and indirectly involved in the grant writing...
On the morning of Aug. 10, trapped in my Westside neighborhood by street closures associated with the Colorado Classic bike race, I decided to walk the dogs down to Colorado Avenue, mingle with the crowds and watch the racers go by. At 9:45 a.m., Old Colorado City was deserted. No...