What does Colorado Springs have in common with Buffalo, N.Y; St. Paul, Minn.; Tacoma, Wash.; and Topeka, Kan.? It’s simple — we’re all second cities, traditionally eclipsed, overwhelmed and sometimes beaten down by our bullying big brother city. That was certainly the case for us a few years ago,...
I just finished the design of a training program for the senior leaders of a multi-national company. As my partners and I collaborated with the client’s internal HR team, we had lots of good conversations about what this group of leaders did well and where they needed improvement. One thing...
Let us travel back to the dear, dead days beyond recall when Colorado voters, led by the eccentric Douglas Bruce, added the TABOR amendment to the state constitution in 1992. As every subsequent Colorado politician has learned, the Bruce-drafted amendment prohibits local governments from raising or renewing taxes without a vote. Versions of the amendment […]
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Cities are not born by accident. New York, San Francisco and New Orleans began as seaports, gateways to a vast, unsettled country. Heartland metropolises such as Kansas City, St. Louis and Denver were commercial hubs that sprouted from the growth and prosperity generated by the industrial revolution. No one individual created any of those cities. […]
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The CPA’s opinion doesn’t guarantee absolute accuracy of each number on the financial statements. Rather, it does indicate whether the financial statements are a fair presentation of the financial condition and operating results of the company.
Six months ago, just before Christmas, the Colorado Springs City Council approved tax-increment financing for Gold Hill Mesa’s commercial development adjacent to 21st Street and U.S. 24 on the neighborhood’s northwest side. Entering that process, the developers were hoping to begin moving forward soon. But council scaled back the request...
Browsing national real estate listings for “castles,” I found my dream house. It’s a three-story stone mansion in Albany — New York’s state capital — built in 1892 for local businessman Charles Ledow. It’s in splendid condition, with 11 bedrooms, 2½ baths and 26 total rooms. For a Victorian mansion...
While we often here the stories about why many of Colorado Springs’ future leaders find themselves leading the exodus (hey that’s a book in the Bible, isn’t it?)to Denver, the unsung story of those who stay is often left untold. One of these stories worth devoting a word or two to is that of Jackie Goode, a woman in her early 30s who decided to stick around and offer something to the rest who stuck around.
At CSBJ’s Rising Stars event several weeks ago, District Attorney John Newsome brought me papers to come back to the Republican Party. There was a sticky note saying “we will have you back.” This was after I wrote about the Democrats not following up and getting me the paperwork to join their party.
“A billion here, a billion there — and pretty soon you’re talking real money.” That infamous remark, usually attributed to the late Sen. Everett Dirksen (R-Ill.) has long symbolized the spendthrift ways of Washington politicians. Alas, it’s as outdated as 1970s home prices in Aspen.
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Democrat and Republican candidates for president are debating one another about nearly every issue, but nearly all are united about one thing: America faces a crisis of “income inequality.” The rich are getting richer, the refrain goes, while the poor and middle class are held back by stagnating wages, lousy schools and growing health care costs. The solution, we are told, is more government intervention: spend more for education, provide “universal health care,” and force employers to raise wages through minimum-wage increases and union protection legislation.
By Elliot Pulham The Space Foundation just wrapped up the National Space Symposium — the 27th held here in Colorado Springs — and, although I didn’t think it possible after last year, we outdid ourselves again. The potential government shutdown cost us a few government speakers and attendees, but everything else...