The Colorado Springs metropolitan area had the eighth-highest rate of residents who raised their credit scores over the last year, according to a new report.

More than half — 51.6 percent — of Springs residents improved their credit scores between the first quarter of 2018 and the first quarter in 2019.

Nearly 30 percent of people in the Springs saw their credit scores rise at least 25 points; 16.8 percent jumped at least 50 points; 8.5 percent saw a 75-percent improvement; and roughly 4 percent saw their scores go up by more than 100 points, the study found.

At 55 percent, the Provo, Utah metro area had the highest rate of people who improved their credit scores over the last year, with 18 percent of residents seeing their scores rise by more than 50 points, and about 2 percent seeing a 100-point jump.

El Paso, Texas and Spokane, Wash. filled out the top three spots, with about 54 percent and 53 percent respectively, the study found. In both cities, about 16 percent of people saw their scores rise by at least 50 points; in Spokane, more than 3 percent saw their scores go up by more than 100 points, according to the study.

The Denver metro area ranked 26th with 50.4 percent of residents raising their credit scores. Denver had the third-largest rate of residents who improved their credit score by at least 100 points, with 4.2 percent of the population seeing such a dramatic jump.

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The report, “Places Where Credit Scores Are Rising in 2019,” released May 15 by online lending marketplace LendingTree, looked at the 100 largest metropolitan areas across the U.S. and compared credit scores from the first quarter of 2018 to the first quarter of 2019.

Analysts reviewed the credit reports of a sample of over 225,000 My LendingTree users who live in the 100 largest metropolitan statistical areas and compared their scores in the first quarter of 2018 to their scores in the first quarter of 2019. The percentage of people who saw their scores rise by any amount, by at least 25 points, by at least 50 points, by at least 75 points, and by at least 100 points were calculated by their home MSAs.

“Increasing your credit score is a slow and steady process. It takes time for these changes to accumulate over time, and for negative information to drop off of your credit report,” the report states. “But if you are consistent with these steps, the results of our study show that you can increase your credit score over time — and indeed, many people are successful in doing so.”

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