Overdrive Raceway roars into high gear

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Engines at the new Overdrive Raceway roared into action Saturday, as customers took to racing electric go karts on the indoor track at Polaris Pointe in northern Colorado Springs.

The $6.5 million Overdrive Raceway features two stories of indoor go kart tracks. The first-story track opened Saturday, with the second-story track expected to open within three to four weeks, said owner Jim Mundle.

The revenue goal: between $3 million and $4 million in the first year.

“We should do that with a two-track facility,” that each has the capacity to complete 14 races, Mundle said. At any given moment, 30 people can be in karts — 10 racing, 10 at the starting line in the pits and 10 in line, receiving training about safety and procedures.

Saturday’s grand opening attracted more than 1,000 people. The business has processed 170 races so far, he said.

“It’s been packed since it opened,” Mundle said. “It’s probably exceeding my expectations since we only have our one track open and the facility still has construction going on.”

The business includes quarter-mile Formula One tracks, a pro shop, concession area, arcade, bar and lounge and conference rooms.

Originally, the track was to have opened July 2, but construction was delayed due to rain, Mundle said.

“The anticipation was building, so when they opened on July 8, it was really successful,” said Ginger Delgado, public relations agent for the raceway.

“I was very pleased with how everything ran. Being brand new, it went very well,” Mundle said.

The business still awaits delivery from Italy of four hand-controlled go karts made specifically for people with disabilities.

Mundle’s legs were amputated after complications arose from his diabetes. He strives to create an all-inclusive entertainment experience for people with disabilities, including soldiers returning from war, to experience something they normally wouldn’t be able to.

“If you’re a soldier in battle, you’re filled with adrenalin, you get hurt and you come back in a wheelchair, there’s not a lot of places,” to experience fast, friendly entertainment that “gets your adrenalin pumping,” he said. “I think we will provide something the community will embrace.”

To read more about Mundle, click here.

To read more about recreation businesses in northern Colorado Springs, click here.